tree removal

5 Tips On Transplanting Trees

If you love trees then you hate to see them go to waste. If you have trees growing on your property in inconvenient places you might want to transplant them someplace else, why not, it’s a free tree! Here is a list of 5 tips to help you transplant a tree properly.

Prepare the Sitetree transplant

Before you even dig up the tree you should dig the hole first. It should be about three times as wide and the same depth as the root ball. If you are planting in the fall or the tree is more than 1 inch in diameter, you can rinse the soil off the roots to make it easier to handle. Set the tree in the hole so that the soil line on the tree is even with the surrounding soil. Don’t plant too deep. Cover the roots with dirt and gently pack it. Use the end of a shovel to pack dirt in further and create holes for watering. Form the dirt around the base of a tree into a bowl shape to keep water from flowing out and eroding the dirt away.

Save the Roots

The amount of roots you need to transplant a tree depends on the diameter of the trunk. Deciduous trees with a 1-inch trunk diameter should have a root ball size of about 18 inches wide and 14 inches deep. For a 2-inch diameter trunk, the root ball should be at least 28 inches wide and 19 inches deep.

Plant in the Fall

The best time to plant a tree is when the tree is dormant. Do so before the ground freezes and it can still receive adequate rainfall. Fall planting allows nutrients to be directed to the roots since there is no more demand from leaves.

Water Regularly

prune branches

Because it’s impossible to not damage roots when you transplant a tree, newly transplanted trees need a regular watering schedule for the first two to three years after planting, especially during dry periods. If you are transplanting in the fall when the tree is dormant it is not recommended to water after the first frost.

Prune

To help promote root growth and lessen stress on the tree, young trees should have lower branches pruned. This is especially true if you are planting in any season other than fall. This will help balance the loss of roots and the shock of the transplant. Remember, trees grow out, not up, so those knee high branches are going to have to be cut at some point anyway.

Trees that are over 2 inches in diameter can weigh several hundred pounds. Trees this size should be handled by a professional. If you have any trees that need planting make an appointment with PPM today.

Tree Removal: 4 Essential Tips for Safely Removing a Tree

Do you have a tree that needs to come down? Do you have a chainsaw and the time to do it yourself? Tree removal can be a very dangerous and time-consuming task. It’s usually best left to the professionals, but if you are up for the challenge here are some tips for safely removing a tree.

always be safe with tree removal

Safety First When Cutting Trees

The first thing you need to consider is your safety, other’s safety, and any potential damage that could be caused. Trees are a lot bigger on the ground than you may think. If your tree is more than 20 feet tall then it’s safest to get a professional to do the removal for you.

 

It’s important to check for vehicles, powerlines, or structures in all directions around the tree. It’s also a good idea to let your neighbors know beforehand that you will be removing the tree so they can keep any kids or pets inside. Remember, a dead tree will shatter when it hits the ground sending small, sharp pieces of wood flying in all directions.

Which Direction?

Before you start cutting decide which direction you want the tree to fall. If the tree is already leaning in the direction you want it to fall, congratulations, you’re job is made significantly easier. But if you need to coax the tree in a certain direction or you are working in an extremely cramped space you have two options.

Notch Cutting

Cutting a notch in the trunk will make tree removal much easier

This is the most common and safest method of felling a tree. Start by cutting a notch in the tree on the side you want it to fall. Make the top cut first then make the bottom cut. If done correctly a notch will drop out. Many inexperienced cutters will dive right into sawing the tree without making a notch and nine times out of ten the tree will pinch the blade giving you a new task of trying to get the weight of the entire tree off your saw. This is a messy situation that can be easily avoided with a notch. After cutting the notch start cutting from the other side of the tree so it’s level with the corner of the notch. The tree should fall easily in the direction you want.

From The Top Down

Sometimes the location and size of the tree can make cutting it down a little tricky. For instance, if you live in an urban area with lots of wires, houses, and fences around. If this is the situation or if you have a large tree to remove then it may be best to call in the professionals. This method is a bit more dangerous and time-consuming but, if done safely, it can save you from paying for any extensive damage.

 

If you decide to do it yourself then start by securing an extension ladder to the tree. Use a strong rope, you don’t want any wobbling while you’re carrying a chainsaw up. From the top of the ladder see what you can cut. Start with smaller branches, surgically cutting the tree to pieces from the top down. If branches are too big or long it may require you to cut the branch little by little. After cutting all of the branches from the tree you’re left with a tall stump. This can be cut into pieces or felled in an easier and more manageable way.

The Safest Method of Tree Removal: Let the Professionals Handle It

Remember, if you decide to do this yourself, be safe and never take your eyes off a falling tree! If you would like to save yourself the risk and effort contact us at PPM Tree Service & Arbor Care. Let the professionals take care of all of your tree removal needs, call now at (877) 454-8733.

Tree Removal and Pruning: Why Fall is the Perfect Time for Tree Care

It’s that time of year again. The leaves are changing colors and trees are getting ready to go dormant for the winter. After a full season of growing your trees may look a little unruly and need a trim. It’s also a time when disease-bearing insects go into hibernation or die, making it the ideal time to think about tree removal.

Pruning

fall tree removal pruning is a great way to get your tree ready for fall

Pruning not only helps your trees look aesthetically pleasing, it also keeps the tree growing healthy. Low hanging, unnecessary branches draws water and nutrients away from the rest of the tree. Cutting these branches off in the fall, when the tree’s growing cycle has stopped, will redirect the nutrients to the rest of the tree and bolster its growth in the spring.

What To Use

Low hanging and small reachable limbs can be cut with pruning shears, clippers, or hand saws. Don’t worry about protecting the fresh cuts unless the species is susceptible to disease. Large, out of reach limbs or entire tree removal should be done by a professional.

Signs That It’s Time to Remove That Tree

Fall is upon us and by now the leaves on your trees are beginning to change colors and fall. If you have any sick trees in your lawn then fall is a great time to identify them and have them removed before winter comes. Here are a few diseases to watch out for:

Dutch Elm Disease

Carried by bark beetles, this invasive disease was first reported in the U.S. in 1928. By 1950 it had spread to Detroit and it’s suburbs, devastating the lofty elms that shaded most streets at the time. Despite a large-scale spraying campaign the disease spread through Michigan, decimating the elm population through the 70s. Since then the disease has come back several times and still affects the small number of elms remaining. An infected tree’s leaves will begin to turn yellow and drop off in summer months.

Oak Wilt

Oak Wilt is a disease caused by fungus carrying beetles. The disease most likely originated in Latin America, carried to the US by beetles that feed on the sap of oak trees. Confirmed in 56 counties in Michigan, this disease affects all species of oak but kills red oaks much faster than white oaks. You will start to see the leaves turn brown on the tips and work its way down. Eventually, the tree will lose its leaves and die within months. The Michigan DNR recommends not pruning your oaks from April through the end of summer because this is when the tree is most vulnerable.

Needle Blight

Have you noticed your pine trees turning brown, losing needles, or its needles looking abnormally thin? Then you might have needle blight. The fungus mycosphaerella pini causes needle blight and affects over sixty species of pine. The fungus spreads to other branches and trees by rain dripping through infected branches or by physical touch. If you see your pines exhibiting signs of needle blight then prune the infected branches and clean up any needles under the tree, ideally in the fall,  and move them to a safe location where the spores cannot infect other trees.

Take Action

tree removal pruning

After you’ve determined that your tree is infected and dying it is imperative to have that tree safely removed and the wood properly destroyed. Check with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources about transporting infected wood. In some cases, as with infected Elm trees, it is illegal to transport.

Get Professional Tree Removal Help

If you need a tree removed or pruned don’t wait until it’s too late! Contact us about our professional tree removal and pruning services at PPM or call us at, (877) 454-8733.

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