Month: July 2018

When And Why You Should Cable Your Trees

We often imagine the trees on our property growing straight, secure, and healthy. However, sometimes, trees and large ornamental plantings grow erratically. Over time, their trunk and physical structure may fail to support the weight of its canopy and branches. If you notice that your tree is leaning excessively or showing signs of failure, take action! It’s essential to contact a certified arborist to discuss if tree cabling should be considered.

Tree Cabling: What You Need To Knowwhy and how to cable a tree

Cabling is a bracing method used by tree specialists and certified arborists to strengthen and preserve plantings with compromised growth patterns. Your chosen professional may recommend cabling your trees in several specific situations including:

Young Plantings

Young trees are often at a high risk to suffer from irregular growth. Before planting your new tree, it’s important to consider the height of the tree itself compared to the circumference of its root ball. If the canopy of the planting is significantly larger than the root system, cabling may prove an ideal solution to prevent unhealthy leaning. Cabling can also help young saplings planted in areas with high winds and drier soil for tipping over as well.

Mature Trees

When a tree is young, the burden of its branches on the area of attachment is generally insignificant. However, as the plant ages, its limbs may begin to droop under its own weight. Heavy snow, foliage, and fruit can also impact the tree’s inability to support its branch load. Strategic cabling can adequately redistribute the burden throughout the limbs to prevent a break as well as maintain a specific height or clearance if needed.

Restoring Vertical Splitscable the limbs of your tree to save it form falling

Sometimes structural stress or an unexpected storm can cause cracks or vertical splits throughout the tree. Splits can quickly destroy the health of even the sturdiest of trees, making it crucial to immediately contact a professional arborist at the first sign of damage. Cabling can be used to arrest further deterioration of damaged trees and extend their overall life expectancy. When successful, restorative cabling can eliminate the need for removing entire limbs or the tree itself.

Minimize Property Damage

Damaged or leaning trees can eventually break, damaging nearby structures such as sheds, fences, and even parts of a home or office building. Your chosen arborist will be able to determine if a tree’s trajectory may impact your property or assets and create a cabling strategy to reduce your risk.

Reduce Threat Of Personal Harm

Beyond property damage, a compromised tree that breaks or falls over may cause physical harm as well. The threat of injury is exceptionally high if the planting is in a populated space or an area that receives a lot of passing traffic. Cabling can support the impaired tree to help preserve the safety of anyone in the plant’s trajectory.

Contact PPM Tree Service Today

Are you concerned by leaning or drooping trees on your home or business property?

PPM Tree Service & Arbor Care can help!

Contact us today for a no-risk consultation with one of our onsite ISA certified arborists to discuss if your plantings could benefit from cabling or bracing.

10 Michigan Plants Native Americans Used Every Day

Michigan Plants With Homeopathic Remedies

Native Americans have a centuries-long tradition of using plants for medicinal purposes. Here in Michigan, entire tribes relied on what they found in nature to cure sicknesses, heal wounds, and promote health and wellness amongst its people. Here are 10 Michigan plants that Native Americans used every day to create homeopathic remedies.

Yarrow

Also known as Achillea Millefolium, yarrow is a highly aromatic plant that is often used in ornamental landscapes. Native American tribes used the beautiful flowering tops of yarrow in their traditional herbal medicine practices as a means to stop excess bleeding. Applying the buds directly to cuts and wounds promotes blood clotting. Additionally, some tribes created a drink from yarrow juice and water to cure an upset stomach and other intestinal discomforts.

Blackberries

Speaking of upset stomachs, many Native Americans used deliciously sweet blackberries to treat a range of stomach issues. Additionally, blackberries were used to relieve inflammation throughout the body. The berry was often mixed with honey or maple syrup to soothe sore throats. Tribes even used the plant to treat bleeding gums and give immune systems an all-natural boost.

Mint

Beyond standard digestive issues, mint leaves were often made into an ointment and applied to irritated skin. Once applied, the pulverized mint would sooth rashes and itchy patches.

Rosemary

This fragrantly savory herb was revered as a sacred plant by many Native American tribes. They tapped into its medicinal properties to reduce joint pain.

Sage

Sage is another popular herb today that was hailed as sacred by indigenous Native Americans. Various tribes believed that sage had purifying properties and could effectively eliminate unwanted energies from the body. Sage was also used for more tangible physical relief on cuts, bruises, cramps, and even cold and flu symptoms.

Mullein

Mullein bears a strong resemblance to tobacco and, ironically, was used as a primary ingredient to treat respiratory disorders. Additionally, mullein roots were made into salves to reduce swelling in joints and extremities.

Lavender

Lavender is a staple here in Michigan and throughout the Midwest. Today, we love this plant’s fragrance and beautiful blooms. However, Native Americans used lavender to treat a range of conditions including headaches, fatigue, depression, and anxiety. Lavender oil contains a potent anti-inflammatory agent, making it an excellent option for bites and burns.

Black Gum Bark

The black gum tree is one of the loveliest trees found in the U.S. Native Americans saw beyond its beauty and recognized that the bark of this tree had healing energies. They would make a tea from the bark to help with chest pains.

Wild Rose

honeysuckle in michigan
Wild rose was used in several traditional treatments. Many tribes believed in the healing power of wild rose as both a preventative and cure for the common cold. When made into a tea, the petals also healed sore throats. Some even used wild rose as a mild diuretic.

Honeysuckle

Many Native Americans used honeysuckle to treat multiple ailments such as hepatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and even mumps. It was also used to help with asthmatic symptoms and upper respiratory tract infections.

What are some of your favorite homeopathic remedies using plants and herbs? Tell us about it in the comments below!

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